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ICYMI Amazon is making moves to correct injustices within and challenges its rivals to raise wages:

https://techcrunch.com/2019/04/11/amazon-ceo-jeff-bezos-challenges-rival-retailers-to-raise-their-minimum-wages-too/

Bezos isn't "correcting injustices", he's throwing PR money at the problem. I happened to talk to three current and former employees from the packing line, and the working conditions outlined ITA are accurate, if understated. There was also some suggestion that the working conditions there contributed to their current mental health state.

That bathroom thing isn't a joke (for example). Depending on where you are on the floor, the bathroom can be a 7-10 minute round trip, not including stall time. That's ten minutes you're not filling your quota. And the trip can take long enough that if a manager notices, they'll want to 'talk to you' which isn't a write-up, but a mark, and more time you're no filling your quota.

Lunch is an hour, but it can take 20 minutes to get through the metal detectors on the way off the floor.

And yes, you're being constantly watched, both electronically and by persons

Suck up your injuries. If you can't work, we'll find someone else.

and on...

As someone who is pro-union and very familiar with state and federal labor laws in right to work states also (I used to be a union rep.), if employees have cause to action they should pursue it. I support the concerns but I know nothing is accomplished regarding positive changes in the workplace by only talking and protesting. Talk is cheap, action is required on their part - even if it means finding other work, training for a new career, or moving where the work conditions are better. Companies also locate facilities where they know they can get the type of workers they need already trained for them in most cases. If potential workers go elsewhere, they will make the changes to keep them there. As someone mentioned today, all for profit companies have a prime directive to make money. But not all corporations are greedy - Costco for example is pro-union. Wealth is not the problem - greed is the problem.

Progressive change in the workplace can't be just about talking to current and former employees online or even on the phone or in person for that matter. Proof has to be provid... show more

FYI there is also a Freelancers Union I support.

I'm gonna drop so I don't forget,, but like GM is ripping their offerings. The Tahoes and big pickups are actual money. The Chevy Volt is nor, to the tune of they're going to have to give them away for free in CA soon. UAW costs are like $19/hr average. Paycheck
You and I would expect double, so $18/hr is like $36 with tax, health insurance, etc.
A UAW worker, that $18/hr is more like $60-80/hr and often for nothing but contract, and don't understand why Mexico is cheaper even with tariffs.

That is why the average consulting rate in the US is $75 per hour.

Oh that is interesting... hmm. On the one hand, in doing so, he is creating potential subcontract companies. On the other hand he is creating competition for himself in the same manner software companies open a portion of their source code - to get known issues fixed and new ideas worked in a partnered manner. Both approaches actually lead to job creation and promote entrepreneurs - he was one once. Yes, in the software world unjust appropriation does happen by corporations - but in some cases successful open source projects are bought for high dollars. Bezos may be looking at that potential on delivery services as well to justify that investment. Will there be shoddy ones that treat IC's poorly like Uber and Lyft? Of course there will but there will also be good ones that innovate and treat workers well. Given Bezos' apparent vision to be the logistics giant of space travel whether sub-orbital, orbital, short range, or long range, innovation in delivery is needed. So I will watch this with interest to see where it goes.