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Distro personal crisys (an open letter to myself... )


tl;dr I think this is something that happens from time to time but I think I need to change distro for a while. And I just realized this long post is for me, because I have to deal with my ideals and I am not really happy to do that, but I am not having fun with Debian recently and I need to solve it.


After ten years of #Debian I see Debian changing in something that I don't recognize or I don't feel comfortable with it. Many years ago Debian was also synonymous of innovations, on every fields, today what happens in Debian is, along to slow, behind the scene, like the Risc-V port but for the Desktop area there is nothing exciting and since the #systemd debate I had the feelings that Debian simply refused to lead in favor on just following the events. I mean I am really prone to think if tomorrow Ubuntu is shipped with Just snaps that Debian will follow the same, honestly... show more

@Debacle

Thanks for sharing that video, it was very interesting.

@Daniel Glad you like it!



 

System76 firmware update


Since my first (and unique) System76 laptop purchase I have never had a kind word for this company. I have been always complaining about their policy to support just Ubuntu... However it seems they did some steps toward to non Ubuntu or Pop_os users, in fact I was able to update the firmware just with a usb iso (pop_os!) in demo mode and everything worked totally fine as described in their documentation.

At least for one time System76 were been able to let me say something positive about you! 🍻

https://support.system76.com/articles/laptop-firmware/

#linux #system76 #firmware #ubuntu #laptop #laptops
#linux #system76 #firmware #ubuntu #laptop #laptops firmware laptop linux

I have to repost it because who read this from Mastodon can't read my comment made from Diaspora...

The main issue is manufacturers want tight their os with their hardware. It happens the same with PureOS, it is a very close derivates of Debian but doesn't work exactly as Debian, it is designed to work with their hardware. Fine, it makes sense from the manufacturers perspective but not for a end-user point. The main difference between Purism and System76 is the former contributes back in upstream to Debian so everyone can take advantage of it, even System76.

Ubuntu from my point of view is a unbalanced distro that takes care more of perspective end users rather than power users, while Pop_os, that is an Ubuntu derivative, is awfully bonded with systemd. Please stay far away both from me.

I am likely prone to buy another System76 hardware if they would start selling those with RedoxOS as primary OS rather than whatever *buntu and derivatives.

By the way from my point of view those companies that sell Linux computers are making an HUGE error when
... show more

I totally disagree. Probably more than 95% of sold computers are made to work on one OS, either Windows or MaOS in case of Apple. Linux being OpenSource can and have found compatibility with most hardware, but that's mostly because of it's open nature and don't forget... The Linux Foundation that works on the kernel is funded by those same companies like Microsoft, IBM, etc. Then it comes a company that somehow made it almost mainstream but still small, to be out their way and sell computers focused on providing Linux for the masses. They are small but dedicated, still managed to created their own OS to provide maximum compatibility with their own hardware. But somehow many feel entitled to ask for more? HP does not provide drivers for my HP laptop nor I have the ability to update the BIOS because I erased Windows. Guess who's gonna trouble shoot? hint, Not HP. The same with Apple. and yet you have the nerve to ask System76 or any other Linux selling provider for that matter to support more than they can handle or should business wise.
The same with other Softwar... show more

Fine, so we have to separate all this matter in computers/laptops that are Linux friendly and the ones that are Ubuntu friendly, in this scenario I select the former ones... So it means that Ubuntu friendly != Linux friendly, this companies must be more clear to avoid confusion on their customers.

@Ismael J HP does provide drivers... some are just straight from hardware vendors, but others are are modified by HP specifically for their machines. And they tend to do this for all the recent and in-use variants of Windows OS. I think that's what we expect from vendors for Linux. How would you feel if HP only gave you drivers for Windows 8 32bit home-edition version that came pre-installed... you cannot get it to work at all with windows 10, Windows 8 Pro, or even older Windows 7 if you hate windows 8. This would be unacceptable, no?

Linux is not a bunch of different OSes (for the most part) it's just different distros, and just like Windows versions, usually the drivers only require minor changes and to be packaged a little differently (for, say, Debian and Fedora) - not totally rewritten or anything like that.

I think it's perfectly reasonable to expect that a manufacturer selling a 'Linux computer' should provide drivers packaged for the handful of major distros - much lik... show more
This entry was edited (2 months ago)



 

The pointlessness of the FSF endorsed distros based on Ubuntu...


A pure Free-Software distro is a very hard ambition as well as an hard goal to accomplish, you have to deal with your hardware and if your hardware is not compliance with the free Software it is almost impossible running a pure libre distro. But back to time when even installing a standard distro was an impossible task, Ubuntu came out helping a lot of people making easier installing linux on whatever hardware. However we have to flip the point of observation, at the beginning there were just free drivers mostly made through reverse engineering, most of them were too buggy or unreliables, and the few closed drivers were hard to obtain or unavailable to the end users. Hence running a linux distro and having a laptop or a PC with 100% hardware recognized was very hard to achieve but not for Ubuntu. Ubuntu made easy installing blob binaries on Linux and making your hardware properly working, cool! All of we are in debt with Canonical for this because Ubuntu broken this barrier and helped all the distro to achieve the same, pointing the direction to follow. The main point is Ubuntu used... show more
#linux #ubuntu #debian #freesoftware #fsf #libresoftware #softwarelibre #linuxlibre #gnu #floss #inux debian floss freesoftware fsf gnu libresoftware linuxlibre softwarelibre ubuntu

Carrying water for software owners is a compromise. Debian hosting non free software is a waste of resources that should go to making better free software. Allowing someone to set up a tent to install non free software outside of a FSF event, as long as the person dresses up as a devil, is not such a compromise, it's just another way of telling people that non free software gives an evil third party control of your computer. I think that Debian did a better job of shielding users from non free software than Ubuntu did, but they can do better still by dropping it all on the floor.

Debian hosting non free software is a waste of resources that should go to making better free software. Allowing someone to set up a tent to install non free software outside of a FSF event, as long as the person dresses up as a devil, is not such a compromise
#specialpleading #splittinghairs

of course it is a compromise. it is just an acceptable compromise. but it is a compromise. if it werent, then “as long as the person dresses up as a devil” would be irrelevant. the “deal” and the “compromise” are practically the same thing. “if you dress like this and stay out of the room, you can be part of our event whereas you werent before.” you might as well say that as long as you put a big warning on cigarettes, it isnt a compromise to allow them to be sold instead of banned. (im not against the move from the fsf, but its a very silly argument that it isnt a compromise.)